Poulawack Cairn and Ringfort

Poulawack burial cairn was excavated in 1935 and found to contain the remians of 18 people, buried at different times between 3350 BC and 1400 BC. It is about 21 metres in diameter and two and a half metres high, significantly smaller than when it was surveyed by TJ Westropp 100 years ago.

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Ringfort
200 metres east of the cairn is a ruined ringfort. The entrance of a souterrain (underground tunnel) inside the fort is still visible
The souterrain entrance outside the fort
The souterrain entrance outside the fort

Magh Adhair

 Magh Adhair, near Quin, Co Clare

The inaugural mound of the Kings of the Dal gCais, including Brian Boru, later the first High King of Ireland. The mound is in the centre of a large, natural amphitheatre, and is reputed to be the burial place of Adhar, brother of Aengus of Dun Aengus (on the Aran Islands).

Mound
John O’Donovan suggested in 1839 that the mound probably contained an early iron age tomb
 Section of the fosse, up to the causeway
Section of the fosse, up to the causeway
The causeway, on the western side of the mound
The causeway, on the western side of the mound
basin stone
Basin stone to the north of the mound. It has been suggested that as part of the ritual, the new king would wash himself with sacred water from the basin
 Pillar stone on the other side of the Hell river, located directly across from the causeway
Pillar stone on the other side of the Hell river, located directly across from the causeway

Nenagh Castle

Nenagh Castle, Co Tipperary

Nenagh castle, the finest example of a cylindrical keep in the country, was built around 1200 AD by Theobald Fitzwalter, who came over with first Anglo-Norman invasion.

The upper windows and crenellations were added in the 19th century
The upper windows and crenellations were added in the 19th century
Tie stones show where the curtain wall ran from the west side of the tower
Tie stones show where the curtain wall ran from the west side of the tower
The garderobe
The Garderobe
Looking down on the ruins of the southern gatehouse and tower
Looking down on the ruins of the southern gatehouse and tower
The keep with the gatehouse in the background
The keep with the gatehouse in the background
Round-arched embrasure
Round-arched embrasure

Hag’s Head

Hag’s Head, The Cliffs of Moher

Stunning scenery, probably the most spectacular stretch of coastline in the country – but best avoided in the windy weather!

 A Napoleonic watch tower, built in 1803
A Napoleonic watch tower, built in 1803, close to the site of a 1st-century BC fort (long since disappeared)
Looking from Hag's Head across to Doolin
Looking from Hag’s Head across to Doolin

 

The curious rock formation from which Hag's Head gets it's name
The curious rock formation from which Hag’s Head gets it’s name
 The cliffs
The cliffs rise up to 700 feet above sea level

Killilagh Church

Killilagh Church, Doolin, Co Clare

Dating from c.1500, the roof of the church was set on fire by Cromwellian soldiers while mass was being said inside.

West Gable
The west gable, with a small square-topped bell chamber and window
Ogee-headed window in the side chapel
Ogee-headed window in the side chapel

 

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Macnamara tomb
The empty Macnamara tomb, which served as a temporary “jail” during the War of Independence

Oughtmama

Oughtmama,The Burren, Co Clare

An ancient monastic settlement, originally founded by St Colman Mac Duagh. The largely 12th century ruins are situated in a fertile valley among the spectacular limestone hills of the Burren.

East Church
The east church, situated outside the inner enclosure and possibly a lady chapel?
Round Headed Doorway
Round headed doorway in small oratory
Western Church
Western church, with oratory to the rear
Trabeate Doorway
Trabeate doorway, western church